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European Union: primary law

Primary law

Primary law, also known as the primary or original source of law, can be seen as the supreme source of law in the European Union (EU). It is at the apex of the European legal order. It consists mainly of the founding treaties of the European Union.

The primary law concerns also:

  • the major Treaties amending the EU;
  • the Protocols annexed to those Treaties;
  • additional Treaties making changes to specific sections of the founding Treaties;
  • the Treaties of accession of new Member States to the EU.

 

The Treaties establishing the different European Communities

The Treaties establishing the different European Communities are:

The amending Treaties

The additional Treaties making changes to specific sections of the founding treaties are:

Accession Treaties

The Acts of Accession signed by Norway on 22 January 1972 and 24 June 1994 never came into force. A Treaty signed on 1 February 1985 gives Greenland a special status.1

 


  1. EUR-Lex