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EndNote X9 Basic course

5.3 Changing style

An advantage of using EndNote for referencing in text, is that it is very easy to replace a chosen output style by another.
If you offer a manuscript to one journal and then to another which works with another style, adjusting the manuscript can be done very easily.

In the previous section we added some references to a text according to the APA 6th style.
This is one of the best known Author/Date styles.
A lot of styles also work with numbers in the text and a numbered reference list.
Now we are going to change the text of the previous section (which was written according to the APA style) into a text with a numbered output style.
The text in the previous section which was written according to the APA 6h style, looked like this:

Journal impact factors vary from year to year. Therefore it is more reliable to use impact factors of several years instead if just one year. Research has shown that review articles receive more citations than research articles (Moed & Van Leeuwen, 1995). Journals with many review articles can therefore more easily get a high impact factor than journals with many research articles.

Recently a discussion has started about the use of impact factors in research evaluation because the Internet has led to new forms of publication (Moed, 2006; Zhao, 2005).

REFERENCES

Moed, H. F. (2006). New developments in citation analysis and research evaluation. Information Services & Use, 26, 135-137.

Moed, H. F., & Van Leeuwen, T. N. (1995). Improving the accuracy of Institute for Scientific Information's journal impact factors. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 46, 461-467. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(199507)46:6<461::AID-ASI5>3.0.CO;2-G

Zhao, D. Z. (2005). Challenges of scholarly publications on the Web to the evaluation of science: A comparison of author visibility on the Web and in print journals. Information Processing & Management, 41, 1403-1418. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ipm.2005.03.013

Now we are going to manage the references in this text according to the numbered output style Vancouver.
We do the following:

We go to the Word document mentioned above.
There we change

into the Vancouver style:

Now the references are written according to the Vancouver output style.
Should this not be the case, click on 

Journal impact factors vary from year to year. Therefore it is more reliable to use impact factors of several years instead if just one year. Research has shown that review articles receive more citations than research articles (1). Journals with many review articles can therefore more easily get a high impact factor than journals with many research articles.

Recently a discussion has started about the use of impact factors in research evaluation because the Internet has led to new forms of publication (2, 3).

REFERENCES

1.          Moed HF, Van Leeuwen TN. Improving the accuracy of Institute for Scientific Information's journal impact factors. J Am Soc Inf Sci. 1995 Jul;46(6):461-7.

2.          Moed HF. New developments in citation analysis and research evaluation. Information Services & Use. 2006;26(2):135-7.

3.         Zhao DZ. Challenges of scholarly publications on the Web to the evaluation of science: A comparison of author visibility on the Web and in print journals. Inf Process Manage. 2005 Dec;41(6):1403-18.

Some styles work with footnotes.
EndNote can handle that as well, but the situation is a bit more complex. 
In such a case you make footnotes in your Word processor. From EndNote you add a reference in the footnote.
For this you can use in EndNote the footnote style Chicago 16th Footnote for example.